The best Star Wars video ever

December 24, 2015

I would kill to have this experience before I die.

Advertisements

My favorite poem

December 19, 2015

I was introduced to this in Mrs Karp’s high school English class. The typewritten copy I made then has followed me around for over 30 years since then.

Poemectomy

The trouble was they left her too much alone,

feeding on books and dreaming of love

and watch willow tree shadows

sway across the polluted river.

 

Instead of running about and laughing

and talking of nothing with the other girls,

she grew wistful and wan and dangerously thin

and after hours of pondering such things as

frost on a window

or the frail filament fingers of an old nun on a bus,

she would look weaker than ever

and complain of a terrible pain in her chest.

 

Until late one night they rushed her to the hospital

and worked over her for hours in Emergency,

removing a huge tumorous verse

so horrible that even the nurses grew sick when they saw it.

For days afterwards

she was draining words where the stitches were

and then only a few letters now and then

until the wound was completely healed.

 

But there’s still a large scar where they made the incision

and even now when she sees things

like a bird on a twig

or the shadows of leaves on the sand

or a butterfly wing washed up on the shore,

the scar turns pink or a livid red

and you almost wonder

if they succeeded in getting out all the infection.

 

John W. Dickson

 

 


Ninja Pagan marriage ceremony

December 19, 2015

This is the script of the first Pagan handfasting/marriage I priestessed back in the ’90s. The bride and groom were Pagan but were not out to their families. They wrote the ceremony to meet their spiritual needs without giving anything away and they told everyone I was a minister rather than a priestess. I like to think this kind of subterfuge is no longer necessary but I’m not that naive. Anyway, I think they did an absolutely lovely job. It’s actually one of the proudest moments of my life, standing at the altar in Beck Chapel, in a role that I would’ve gotten burned at the stake for in years past.

15 minutes of seating music. (Organist plays Bach Preludes and Trio Sonatas)

Cairril Adaire (CA) and D (groom) enter from behind the altar. D puts rings on the altar.

Attendants enter in pairs. (Organist plays overture to Handel’s Water Music Suite.)

C (bride) enters. C walks down the aisle with father, hugging him at the pew before walking on to the altar in the front. (Water Music Overture should still be playing.)

CA: Friends and family, we have come here this evening to witness a new beginning to C and D’s life together. This wedding should  remind us that, like the seasons, life moves in cycles.

While the first flowers of spring are gorgeous to behold, compellingly sweet to the senses, we know that it takes several seasons, much tender care, and the weathering of many storms for the fruit of those flowers to grow and ripen. Similarly, it takes time for love to mature and reach completion.

To be in a loving relationship does not guarantee an eternal summer. To make a sincere and honest commitment does not promise an end to all struggle. What a good relationship does is offer the never ending opportunity for renewal. It recognizes the abiding, shared hope that after every winter, spring will come again.

In marriage, we make a commitment to weather patiently the cold and bitter times, to protect and tend the original seed until it bursts into bloom again.

We are here to celebrate beginnings, and to acknowledge that love, as anything else that we wish to grow and prosper, requires care and nurture.

D, if you would ask C to be your wife, speak to her and those assembled of your love, that she, and they, may know what is in your heart.

D: C, the love I feel for you shows itself in all I do. In perfect love and perfect trust, I open myself to you. No longer just the product of my own experiences, I now allow the image of who I am to shape who I become. From this day, what one of us does will affect both of us. We are still two independent beings, with our own wills, our own dreams, our own interests, but in the larger scheme of things, I bind my destiny to yours with three promises: I love you, I trust you, and I honor your freedom. Everything else may change, but love, trust, and freedom will remain.

CA: C, if you would ask D to be your husband, speak to him and those assembled of your love, that he, and they, may know what is in your heart.

C: D, I promise to be your wife, which is many things, like friend and companion, but is certainly not all things. I promise to remember that while marriage is perfect, the people in it are not and to be as patient with you as you are patient with me. And I promise that I will abide with you and be your love to the end of our days together, whatever life may bring us until then.

Unity candle: C gets a taper from the altar and lights it on the candelabra. D follows suit. When both have lit tapers, they light the unity candle together. Both place their lit tapers back on the altar. (Organist plays Corelli)

D (pick up ring): With this ring, I offer myself to you as husband, with all my faults, and all my strengths. Will you accept me as your partner in all the future may bring?

C: I will. (D places ring on C’s finger.)

C (pick up ring): With this ring, I offer myself to you as wife, with all my faults, and all my strengths. Will you accept me as your partner in all the future may bring?

D: I will. (C places ring on D’s finger.)

CA: Before all who are assembled here, C and D have freely pledged themselves to one another. May the powers of creation grant their minds the clarity of wisdom, their souls the strength of will, their hearts the depth of feeling, and the bodies the wellspring of health to walk life’s path together as husband and wife.

The veil: D lifts C’s veil and gives her a big sloppy-wet moose kiss.

CA: Go forth in peace, carrying the joy of this day in your hearts.

Recessional. (Organist plays selection from Handel’s Water Music Suite.)


The creation of policy

December 17, 2015

I found this in a file folder and don’t know where it comes from. At the bottom is a handwritten note: “Euphemius Chl vi,” but I don’t think this is from the 9th century. 😉 This little story is exactly why I hate working for big organizations.

In the beginning was the plan

Then came the assumptions

And the assumptions were without form

And the plan was completely without substance

And darkness came upon the faces of the clerks

And they spake unto their Supervisor saying:

“It is a crock of shit and it stinketh”

And the Supervisor went unto the Team Leader and sayeth unto him:

“It is a pail of dung and none may abide the odour thereof”

And the Team Leader went unto his Manager and sayeth unto him:

“It is a container of excrement it is very strong and none may abide by it”

And the Manager went unto his head of sub-division and sayeth unto him:

“It is a vessel of fertilizer and none may abide its strength”

And the Manager of sub-division went unto his Divisional Manager and sayeth:

“It is a container which aids plants and is very strong”

And the Divisional Manager went unto his Director and sayeth unto him:

“It promoteth growth and is very powerful”

And the Director went unto the Board and sayeth unto them:

“This powerful new plan will promote the growth and efficiency of the company”

And the Board looked upon the plan and saw that it was good

And thus the plan became policy.


Witchcraft: One woman’s journey

December 13, 2015

I always wanted to be good. I paid attention to the adults around me and all the cultural cues and tried to be a good girl. In my Catholic home that meant things like not eating for an hour before Communion and going to confession (truly contrite) and singing out loud and strong as one of the faithful. I accepted all the norms around me and strove to be the best I could be. I wasn’t particularly introspective about my faith until I was a teenager.

We had a cousin that all the adults whispered about. When she got pregnant at 16 she stayed with us for a while. And later, when her marriage was breaking up, her three children came to us for a summer. Erika was four years old. I was 14.

She had the olive skin of her father and huge dark eyes and she sang You Are My Sunshine over and over and over until I wanted to rip my brain out of my ears. My boyfriend and I took her on my paper route, pretending she was our little girl, frolicking around in front of us as we lazily made our way down the street. Erika was bright and cute and lively and cuddly.

A year later I was pitching at a softball game and the catcher couldn’t catch, which infuriated me. I patterned myself after my brother Steve, and as he had a red-hot temper on the basketball court, I had one on the baseball field. Absolutely ballistic. I was vaguely aware of my mom and sisters coming to the game late but I was so focused on the idiot catcher that I took no notice of them. We lost the game but went to Dairy Queen afterwards anyway, where I got a caramel sundae.

After I got home I was fuming alone in my room, still tasting the caramel, when my mom came in and sat me down. I don’t know how she told me. I just remember the mental picture she created while that sticky ice cream taste rolled around in my mouth.

Erika had been with her brothers and dad in a store and, in a freak accident, a display of doors had fallen on her. Broke her neck in seven places. My little girl was dead.

As I sobbed my guts out my mom said, “You feel things more deeply than other people do. That’s a great gift from God but it makes things like this harder.” I registered that that was the first time I felt like my mother had ever really seen me. But the grief was paramount.

One of my earliest memories is of my Great-Grandma Radloff’s funeral. My parents, both Capricorns, took the Extremely Rational view that death could happen at any time and if it did, they wanted us kids to know how to behave. We were a Catholic family. We had a lot of relatives. Which meant lots of funerals.

Erika’s was of course different from all the rest. They’d asked me to sing but I could barely handle being in the chapel. For reasons I will never understand, they had an open casket. She was green. My little girl’s skin was green.

During the funeral her father hunched over and as the priest paused for a breath little Nicky, Erika’s three-year-old brother, asked clear as a bell, “Daddy, why are you crying?” The whole thing was beyond heart-wrenching.

I grew up through that experience. And I found my faith. I spent more and more time at church and developed a special relationship with the Virgin Mary. I prayed to her when I was crippled by cramps (who better to understand cramps than Mary? certainly Jesus couldn’t relate!). I would go to the red-tinted chapel after rehearsals and light a candle and just set in her presence. I carried around a battered copy of the New Testament and studied it in detail, highlighting favorite passages. In Sunday School I listened more closely for what I should do to be a good Catholic girl.

But there was a problem. Mary was “meek and mild.” I didn’t have a meek or mild bone in my body. I was bold and brave and brassy and obnoxious. I knew from The Authority Figures that this wasn’t “ladylike” but I didn’t know how else to be. I kept trying to be what they wanted, kept praying, kept working the rosary, but then I’d get ticked off about something and—boom!—ballistic. In your face.

I struggled through my high school years, wrestling with this problem of submission to God’s will. I actually made a formal submission once. Went to this huge statue of Jesus on US 31 and prayed about my relationships with boys and lay flat out, face down, arms spread out, and said, “Thy will be done.” It made me serious. But I couldn’t tame the beast within. I had too much Irish, that fire that makes me me. But that didn’t fly in the Catholic church.

A breaking point came when I was reading a Marian pamphlet in the church lobby—something about Lourdes or some other visitation—and it said that Mary had appeared and said women should cover their arms. Sleeves no shorter than three-quarter length. These days I wonder why Mary was so specific about sleeve lengths when she could have been giving stock market tips, but at the time I was overcome with a deep sense of loss. I wore short sleeves. I would always wear short sleeves. I would never be like Mary. I would never be good. I grieved. That was when I was 17. That was the beginning of the continental drift.

By the time I was 18 I was in the midst of a complete mental breakdown. Lordy, how I prayed then! Obsessively praying the rosary, thumbing through the Bible, praying on my knees, listening listening listening for some clue to help me find my way through the complete and utter chaos that was my mind.

It was the summer after my senior year when things were at their worst. I was hallucinating. I was self-mutilating constantly. I was convinced that I only existed when people looked at me—as soon as they looked away, I ceased to exist. I was suicidal. All. The. Time. And there was one night when I went outside and stood on the driveway and stared up into the starry sky and cried out, “God, help me!” I dug deep inside of me, to the most vital essence of my soul, and said in words that are true to this day, “I will never need you more than I need you now.” And I looked into that deep, dark sky brilliant with stars and felt and heard—nothing. It was just a sky. There wasn’t the sense that God was listening and withholding for some reason, some test of faith. There just wasn’t anything there. Just—sky. Stars. Night.

It was then that I knew I was truly alone.

When I went off to college I did try to regain my faith at St Paul’s Catholic Center, leading songs and being a reader, but it was no use. I met my first atheist freshman year and to my surprise he wasn’t a trucker. (Somehow it was firmly rooted in my head that all atheists were truckers and all truckers were atheists.) We had spirited debates, me drawing on my Bible knowledge, my boyfriend quoting the Torah, and Monty firing back with no fear of God or hellfire or punishment or consequences at all. It was stunning to me.

By the end of that first year of school I was a confirmed atheist. It came after one day in church when we were reciting the creed and I started, “I believe in God (the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and Earth—I still know it)” but then I stopped. Because I didn’t believe in God. I didn’t believe in any of the things in the creed. What was, was. It was a material world and I existed through my five senses. And I was angry. Boy, was I angry. The more I looked back at the religion I’d imbibed so deeply, the more enraged I got. What a complete crock of shit. And I had fallen for it. There was no God, no Heaven, no Hell, no soul, no afterlife. There was just this one life and then nothing. Done. Everybody saying otherwise was completely batshit. Willingly delusional in exchange for a sense of safety and some meaning for their suffering. And of course, a rationalization for their prejudices.

That lasted about three years. Then I discovered, once the anger started to fade from my system, that I was having—gasp—spiritual yearnings. Not for any particular belief system or even a single belief. I just slowly became aware that I was a spiritual being in addition to a material one and I had needs that weren’t being met. I was baffled. How could I be a spiritual atheist?

I took my problem to a friend and he, like the Delphic oracle, bade me visit the legendary Jim Jeske. Jim was a member of Zoo Crew, the group of friends I hung out with in college, but he was older than I and was intimidatingly intelligent. He knew everything. And he was hilarious as hell. And he was so, so kind to me. He accepted my broken self just as I was and, in little ways, let me know that he was rooting for me. So I made a date with Jeske.

He was living across the street from The House of Hell on the corner of Harold and Alice where many other Zoo Crewers lived, just a half-block from my apartment. It was a nice night when we sat out on his front porch, staring ahead at nothing and me just trying to casually explain my strange situation. Being Jeske, he was thoroughly accepting and met me where I was and said, “Read Drawing Down the Moon.” There were people like I in the world, it appeared. People who were spiritual and atheist. Somehow there was a balance.

For my generation, Margot Adler’s Drawing Down the Moon was the gateway drug to Paganism. Margot (who later became a friend) was an NPR reporter doing a story on Paganism and she got so sucked in she became a Witch. Her book was an exploration of the wild varieties of Paganism being explored in the US, from the Church of All Worlds to Dianic goddess worship to Druidry to Ásatru to the Craft and beyond. As I read I felt a whole new world opening up. These were deeply spiritual people and they had no pope, no priest, no holy book—they followed the calling of their souls wherever that led. And yes, there were atheist Pagans.

I was immediately drawn to Druidism and Witchcraft, in part I believe because they were more structured and ritual-based than the other paths, closer to the spirituality I’d grown up with. I studied some of Margot’s source books and became clear that the Craft was calling me most strongly. This was when the Monroe County Public Library had an outstanding collection of books on Paganism (which was fortunate—I worked at McDonald’s and had zero money) and I devoured everything I could get. Starhawk’s The Spiral Dance was so inspiring I broke into an office at work and xeroxed the whole thing. I went on a backpacking trip to Europe and while in England picked up Wicca: The Old Religion in the New Age by Vivianne Crowley. I read that in one setting once I got home and I knew that this was something I wanted to explore.

Still, I was cautious. I didn’t want to exchange one straitjacket for another. So I started easy, Autumn Equinox of 1989, calling on Egyptian gods and goddesses because I’d fallen in love with them at the British Museum.

It felt—weird. Awkward. I was making things up and I knew it. I was self-conscious. But no matter how clumsy my rituals, my actual spiritual experience was straight crack cocaine. I couldn’t get enough. I was finally alive again.

I studied and practiced for a little over a year and at Samhain 1990 I self-initiated. I re-commit every year and it cracks me up to look back at my original oath. I was very clear that I Was Not Committing To Anything. I Was Rational. There’s a lot of scientific jargon in those early writings. Because what I’d decided was that I was going to make a conscious choice to see the biosphere as sacred. That doesn’t mean the biosphere is sacred. It just means that I choose to see it that way. From that flows a whole set of ethics—no, a whole way of being.

I experimented with ritual, getting ideas from books but jettisoning anything that didn’t work for me. This is quintessential Paganism. When I’m explaining Paganism to those who don’t know anything about it I compare it to a huge buffet table. On this table are all the spiritual beliefs and practices that humanity has ever created or believed. And Pagans get all squealy with delight and get a huge plate and take bits and pieces of anything that strikes their fancy. And the critical part is that, if we try something and don’t like it, we shrug and leave it for others. We don’t throw the dish on the floor and jump up and down screaming, “Heresy!!” If Pagans have any credo, it’s “Do what works for you.” Witches in particular have the Rede which states, “If it harms none, do what you will.” Ultimate freedom and ultimate responsibility.

Over the years I left many pantheons behind and settled on working primarily with Celtic goddesses. My main goddesses are Arianrhod, Brighid, Rhiannon, and Cerridwen, though I work with many others. I am a priestess of Brighid.

I no longer struggle with my faith. I don’t have an external creed that I have to somehow squeeze myself into. My faith always pushes me to be a more excellent human but it’s not about rewards and punishment. I just breathe it. I live it. I say prayers formally and I live prayers informally. I embody the Craft as I see it. Because I chose this path, and because I continue to choose it every morning, it is a living, breathing expression of my—dare I say it?—soul.

There is no God. There is no afterlife. There is no intrinsic meaning in the universe. But that doesn’t mean my heart is empty. On the contrary, it frees me to construct a living organism that is the Craft made manifest, uniquely, through me. My Craft is not the same as anyone else’s, even if we use some of the same words or call on the same goddesses and guides. My path is uniquely mine. I listen for Spirit’s call, the call of the biosphere that is more than five senses, and I respond with what gifts and skills I have at hand. And if someday I change my mind and choose not to believe in a sacred biosphere anymore, that doesn’t mean I leave the Craft behind. Being a Witch means “to bend”—to be organic, in motion, flowing. Beliefs, chosen or no, come and go. The techniques and forms may change. But the path, lit by my unique light, winds on.

I am a Witch. I am home.